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Archived from the original on July 22, Pandas have been kept in zoos as early as the Western Han Dynasty in China, where the writer Sima Xiangru noted that the panda was the most treasured animal in the emperor's garden of exotic animals in the capital Chang'an present Xi'an. Research article Abstract only Adopting a helicopter-perspective towards motivating and demotivating coaching: Hear what it's like to have tinnitus: Evolution; international journal of organic evolution. Fox appeared in commercials for Diet Pepsi, including a memorable commercial that featured him making a robot clone of himself. New Zealand sea lion P.

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Psychology of Sport and Exercise

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In the case of Diet Pepsi, the logo consisted of the small "smile". The Classic Sweetener Blend variety was distinguished by its use of the wordmark along with the "smile" logo, and a light blue label background in contrast to the modern formulation's silver label.

By mid, packages of Classic Sweetener Blend dropped the wordmark, and began using the modernized wordmark instead. With the restoration of aspartame as the main sweetener in the regular version, the alternate label was dropped. While it was initially advertised alongside Pepsi, Diet Pepsi began to be promoted independently in the late s. The musical jingle from this ad generated popular culture appeal to the extent that it was eventually recorded and played on the radio, and later became a Top 40 hit.

Since its inception, musicians, professional athletes, actors and actresses have been featured prominently in the promotion of Diet Pepsi. In , immediately following Super Bowl XIX , the game's respective quarterbacks, Joe Montana and Dan Marino , met in a hallway of what appeared to be a football stadium. Montana of the winning team, buys Marino a Diet Pepsi, and Marino promises to buy the drink the next time.

In the late s, Michael J. Fox appeared in commercials for Diet Pepsi, including a memorable commercial that featured him making a robot clone of himself. In that commercial, Fox's girlfriend played by Lori Loughlin shows up and accidentally hits Fox with the door, causing him to fall down a chute into the basement.

The girlfriend takes the robot clone on a date and leaves the real Fox trapped. Cindy Crawford was also brought back in to introduce a new packaging design for Diet Pepsi, and again in to promote the revised slogan "Light, crisp, refreshing" with an ad which debuted during Super Bowl XXXIX. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Diet Pepsi The Diet Pepsi logo used from ; present. Retrieved May 18, Retrieved April 21, Archived from the original on April 18, Archived from the original on May 28, Archived from the original on March 24, Archived from the original on April 17, Archived from the original on July 22, Archived from the original PDF on October 11, Retrieved April 29, Just two one-minute sessions a week for six weeks dramatically improved the health and physical fitness of men and women in this age group.

Blood pressure dropped and everyday tasks such as getting out of a chair or carrying shopping became easier, after the participants had carried out two one-minute sessions a week for six weeks.

High-intensity training, or HIT, purports to offer at least the same benefits as conventional activity but in the fraction of the time and is the subject of much research. The latest study is the first to focus on whether it may help older people. Researcher John Babraj put six men and women aged over 60 through their paces in his lab twice a week for six weeks.

Each session began with them pedalling all-out on an exercise bike for six seconds before resting for at least a minute to allow their heart to recover and then giving it their all for another six seconds. Researchers from Abertay University in Dundee pictured said short sessions of high intensity exercise could help ease the 'astronomical' cost of ill-health in the elderly. Although they began by doing six six-second sprints, by end of the study, they were able to do ten per session — adding up to 60 seconds of activity.

After just six weeks, blood pressure fell by 9 per cent and day-to-day activities were easier, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reports. Current guidelines say pensioners need to do at least two and a half hours of cycling or fast walking a week, plus two sessions of yoga, gardening or other activities that strengthen muscles. Dr Babraj said that those who do not have an exercise bike can get the same benefit from six-second runs up a steep hill and added: Andrew Marr has blamed the stroke he suffered on experimenting with high intensity exercise.

He said it could be argued that short, sharp sessions put less strain on the heart than lengthier, less intensive ones. BBC presenter Andrew Marr has blamed the stroke he suffered last year on experimenting with high intensity exercise.

Dr Babraj cautioned that people should check with their doctor before embarking on a training programme. Caroline Abrahams of Age UK said: The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. Sunday, Sep 16th 5-Day Forecast.

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How one-minute bursts of exercise can boost health for over-60s in just six weeks